Intergenerational ecological knowledge: The Baram heritage survey

State governments should be custodians of our forests

The Baram Heritage Survey is no ordinary scientific study.

Instead of sending in grad students, the team from the Borneo Project have hired indigenous village-based field technicians to collect comprehensive wildlife, land use and social data for the very first time.

Why indigenous communities? Well they know the context, language, and what every sign and sound they come across means, and have what no university can teach: intergenerational ecological knowledge.

The Borneo Project, Save Rivers and Keruan Organisation have now launched the Baram Heritage Survey Atlases, the culmination of over two years of work conducted by Penan and Kenyah communities in the Baram River basin. The 90-page atlases document how important the forests are for community life and reveal an incredible abundance of rare, threatened, and endangered species that thrive in indigenous-managed territories.

BFM finds out more from Jettie Word, director of The Borneo Project, and Fiona McAlpine, project manager for the Baram heritage survey.

Produced and presented by: Juliet Jacobs



AGENDA RAKYAT - Lima perkara utama
  1. Tegakkan maruah serta kualiti kehidupan rakyat
  2. Galakkan pembangunan saksama, lestari serta tangani krisis alam sekitar
  3. Raikan kerencaman dan keterangkuman
  4. Selamatkan demokrasi dan angkatkan keluhuran undang-undang
  5. Lawan rasuah dan kronisme
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