New Villages resettlement programme during the ‘Emergency’ 1948-60

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BFM Radio recently spoke to Francis Loh about the origins, deprivations and legacy of the mass rural resettlement programmes of 1948 and how it shaped the way we live today in Malaysia.

Jinjang new village in the 1950s
Jinjang new village in the 1950s
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flyer168
2 Oct 2013 12.02am

Just to share this… British role in the distortion of Malaysian history – http://english.cpiasia.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2325&cat Colonial Office files detail ‘eliminations’ to choke Malayan insurgency – http://www.theguardian.com/world/2012/apr/18/colonial-office-eliminations-malayan-insurgency “…The “elimination of ranking terrorists” was a repeated theme in secret monthly reports on casualty figures circulated by the director of intelligence in British-controlled Malaya during the 1950s. Long-lost files from the “emergency” period, when insurgents attempted to drive out colonial occupiers, reveal how the protracted jungle war was fought to drive communist groups into submission and deprive them of food and support. The first tranche of documents belatedly transferred from the Foreign Office depository in Hanslope park, near Milton Keynes, to the National Archives in Kew, show how British officials in Kuala Lumpur interpreted virtually all anti-colonial protests as evidence of a planned communist takeover. But many potentially embarrassing documents, including probably some of those relating to the alleged 1948 massacre by Scots Guards of 24 villagers in Batang Kali, appear to be missing. These missing papers could have been among scores of files listed for destruction in the colony’s final months. A compensation claim by relatives and survivors of… Read more »

najib manaukau
28 Sep 2013 9.39am

Hi Francis, Don’t forget to ask for the rights and also the abuses of the Orang Asli to be looked. They are the real natives of this land, period. Just like Australia and America, they were never ever known as Australia and America to begin with. The Brits travelled round looking for a place, far away from England, to build a panel colony to house their hard core prisons. The first prison they built in Australia, was in Port Arthur, Hobart Tasmania and I might even add to say that it was done without the approval of the sons of the soil, the Aborigines. Likewise the Brits and then the French plus the (people) from Africa went on to ‘find’ or shall I say colonise North America from the natives, the (native)\ Indians and In the process million of the (native) Indians were killed. All these facts are well documented in history books all over the world and sad to say except in Malaya. You will find that the egregious Mahahir once said so long as they have the political power they can virtually enforce anything… Read more »

hussain ibrahim
21 Sep 2013 8.49am

You are doing a good job carry on regardless of problems.