Elections and the current political situation in Sarawak

BFM Radio interviews Andrew Aeria on the political issues and elections in Sarawak.

Image credits: Taib Mahmud (Wikipedia), Sarawak map (blass.com.au)

With 31 parliamentary seats, Sarawak has traditionally been a stronghold of the ruling Barisan Nasional coalition. However opposition gains in the 2011 state elections have challenged the notion that Sarawak is a fixed deposit state for the coalition in the coming 13th General Elections.

For BFM Radio Current Affairs, Kathleen Tan speaks to Associate Professor Dr Andrew Aeria, Lecturer at the Department of Politics and International Relations at the Faculty of Social Sciences, University Malaysia Sarawak on political issues and elections in Sarawak.

Among the topics discussed are:

  • the relationship between the Sarawak state government and the federal government and how this relationship has evolved throughout the years
  • how communal-based politics has been an influence in Sarawak
  • the extent to which the role and responsibilities of the Electoral Commission, such as delineation and proportion of seat size, affect electoral outcomes in the state
  • the voting preferences of the urban vs rural populations in Sarawak
  • the Sarawak people’s perception of the government and level of awareness of institutions such as the Electoral Commission, and if the recent rallies in the Peninsula for free and fair elections have had an influence on their voting preference
  • any developments since the 2011 state elections which may be relevant for the imminent general elections.

Now listen to the interview:

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charlie chan
charlie chan
20 Jun 2012 2.23pm

tough to unseat bn due to the tough terrain n n difficult access. rural interiors are familiar with BN n money lah, sabah n sarawak hold the keys to putrajaya with 56 seats

najib manaukau
15 Jun 2012 1.51pm

…What is it that you are getting as a part of Malaysia ? Instead all your wealths are being siphoned away … into the coffers of the morons … these are what were promised to you when you became part of Malaysia ? Just look at Brunei who had the wisdom … to day they are in control of all the oil revenue the oil is generating. Most important of all they are in control of their own destiny and also the destiny of their people. Also look at Singapore … Thinking that they will return to beg them to be part of Malaysia because Singapore was so dependent on them for everything to survive, including water. So often in the past the morons in Umno, typical of a bunch of bullies, would threaten Singapore for the supply of water to be terminated whenever they are unable to find an answer to any problem. As a result of their constant threats to do that to day Singapore over a short period of time has built 17 reservoirs plus to convert sea water into fresh water for… Read more »