To vape or not to vape?

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Photograph: Wikipedia

Vaping does not help to get rid of smoking but could instead start a new form of addiction, says David Yeoh.

Lately, there has been much talk about vaping among the young and whether there is a need to regulate the sale or use of vaping.

Vaping has been seen as something trendy nowadays as it is perceived by some quarters to be glamorous and less harmful than smoking cigarettes. It has become a hot issue much talked about in Malaysia.

Johor became the first state to ban vape products. Owners of vape outlets in the state were given a month’s grace to to shut down their business. This move has received encouraging support from the public, including health officials.

Vaping should not become a racial issue nor should there be threats to gain political mileage. Instead more consideration and empathy should be placed on the effects of vaping on the health of young people. The crackdown on vape is a good move and benefits the younger generation who are the leaders of tomorrow.

Just think about it unselfishly: the long-term health effects of vaping and the medical costs that would be borne by taxpayers would be overwhelming. People should learn to think whether vaping benefits the younger generation and whether there could be side effects. The question to ponder is whether it would bring more harm than good and whether it could lead to nicotine abuse among the young.

According to a survey conducted, some take to vaping as a result of peer pressure or a desire to be seen as trendy. But the danger is that this practice could lead to smoking and drug use. Vaping does not help to get rid of smoking but could instead start a new form of addiction, which may become a serious problem for society later on.

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There is no scientific evidence to show that vaping helps people to quit their smoking addiction. People should instead seek professional advice from experts instead of resorting to vaping.

As a concerned citizen, I personally feel that other states should follow in Johor’s footsteps by enforcing the anti-vaping law and enacting it in their respective state assemblies. This would be for the good of the younger generation and for the country, which has aspirations of becoming a high-income nation.

David Yeoh Beng Tatt is an Aliran member based in Penang.

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