RM7.9m heist a symptom of something deeper

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This nation has been paralysed by the world’s most deadly enemy – corruption; how do we turn the tide, wonders JD Lovrenciear.

The reported suspension of seven police personnel, including a few senior officers, over RM7. 9 million in cash that allegedly went missing following a ‘drug raid’ on the premises of a businessman raised eyebrows.

It brings into the open a long-held perception among certain quarters that the police force is in need of a revamp, as recommended by the Royal Commission of Inquiry to reform the police in 2005.

What some will be wondering is that if a handful of high-ranking officers could apparently be tempted, would low-ranking personnel on the beat be subject to similar temptation? And how can we be sure that others in the top brass are not abusing the trust, care and protection vested upon them?

The reality is that this nation has reeked with too much corruption and perhaps lacks the will to clean up for good. Even with the clarion call for a ‘new’ Malaysia, we are not sure how long – if ever – it will take for a thorough clean-up.

We would rather take cover arguing as follows:

  • one bad apple does not rot an entire basket
  • do not politicise, and let the authorities do their job
  • there is no country not free of corruption
  • the corruption index is not reliable
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Hence, our national fight remains weak. We continue to pay a higher and higher price for failing miserably after six decades of self-governance and huge financial allocations for religious teachings, places of prayer, moral policing and moral education.

If even elements in the police force can be corrupt, what would you expect of the business community or even the youth going through higher education? How do we begin to stem the widespread inclination to corrupt behaviour, which even a former national leader allegedly indulged in.

This nation has been paralysed by the world’s most deadly enemy – corruption, corrupt attitudes, corrupted values and a corrupt political mantra. How do we turn the tide?

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Nair
Nair

Discipline and Quality Management is the main root of course. How often are Senior Police, Immigration, Customs, JPJ, and Government department officers being audited or check on their wealth?????? Year after years PAC reports of Ministries misuse of money. Zero action.

tunglang
tunglang

No amount of religious teaching can make a man holy without corrupt till death, but put a Rm100 in his left hand and all righteousness disappear in an instant.
You can also wonder why some of the men in blue have to take as long as 15 – 20 minutes to serve a simple summon to a traffic offender!