Malaysia attacked by festering ‘political virus’

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Who do we hold accountable for the mess we are in now, wonders JD Lovrenciear.

While the world remains alarmed over the outbreak of the coronavirus and its precarious eventuality, Malaysians are facing a ‘political virus’ attack.

Just after months of speculation and a grapevine overflowing with news about the prime ministerial succession plans, Malaysians slept well for one night on Saturday 22 February 2020 with Pakatan Harapan laying to rest the stressful speculation. That close-to-midnight press conference following the presidential council meet was a soothing relief for Malaysians.

But within 24 hours, the tables have been overturned as the population now remains gripped with paralysing concerns over the political manoeuvring that is going on.

Nobody knows for sure what is happening including the dozens of journalists scattered all over Petaling Jaya and Kuala Lumpur, scrambling to get updates last night.

Why, Malaysia, why?

Why, PKR, Bersatu, Umno, Pas, MIC, MCA and all the others, why. Pray tell us why this mess?

The economy is teetering on a dangerous slope with the global Covid-19 virus attack.

Our international relations are not paying dividends with our less-than-diplomatic opinions about some nations and their leadership.

And now, Malaysians do not know what on earth is rocking the political landscape here either.

After giving their vote for change at the 2018 general election, what change will we be ultimately given in the days ahead? Or will we be short-changed?

Indeed these are restless days. Who do we hold accountable?

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IT.Scheiss

The reason is pretty simple – i.e. the parties involved in this – Bersatu and PKR are comprised of many ex-UMNO members, who whilst they had left UMNO however brought with them the opportunistic UMNO DNA of feudal-style warlordism and political opportunism.

Also, when you have Anwar talking about crossovers to Pakatan, such as by 16th September 2008, thus giving Pakatan a majority and the ability to grab control of the federal government from BN which was the elected government in 2008, that set the example for others to follow, either successfully or unsuccessfully.

This crossover culture does not exist, or minimally exisis in parties such as DAP, Amanah and PAS, but largely exists in UMNO and parties with ex-UMNO members.