No double standards in enforcing traffic rules, please

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No double standards on the road, please

Many feel entitled and above the law on the road, and the enforcers seem pander to these whims and therefore a culture of double standards lives on, laments Angry Malaysian.

I refer to the recently publicity given to the increasing rate of road accidents and the recent ruckus created by a deputy minister stating that government officers on official business will not be summoned for speeding violations.

Have you all seen how many cars there on the road with dark tinted glass and weird non-regulation number plates? Surely, the enforcers can see this on the roads daily, but there appears to be no sign of any reduction in the number of such cars. How many government vehicles and vehicles with various ‘badges’ obstruct traffic all over town indiscriminately without any action taken against them?

I once got into an argument with the driver of a Kementerian Dalam Negeri official vehicle which was double-parked in Hartamas high street. To be fair, the officer who was in the car instructed the driver to park the car at a designated spot.

On another occasion, a polis bantuan SUV marked with the name of a local construction company was blocking traffic at the Damansara City Centre, and when I pointed it out to the driver, he got agitated and abusive.

I have also noticed, on at least one occasion, a group of two JPJ [Road Transport Department] vehicles driven at high speed on the Elite highway, exceeding the speed limit.

In Malaysia, many feel entitled and above the law. The enforcers pander to these whims and therefore a culture of double standards lives on.

READ MORE:  Traffic offenders appear increasingly incorrigible 

Police outriders accompanying government vehicles are to clear the traffic and for security; they are not meant to break the speed limit. They cannot speed through traffic lights without due care and so on. Many legal cases around the world have ruled that emergency and police vehicles are not entitled to speed and drive recklessly. They must obey the general principles of traffic law.

Angry Malaysian is the pseudonym of an Aliran reader who is always angry because the bright future of Malaysia has been eroded by incompetence, nepotism, apathy, laziness, racism, double standards and arrogance.

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kampong lad
kampong lad
26 May 2016 11.00am

Law enforcers simply means penguatkuasa undang2, but in reality it (appears more like) ada kuasa kuat.