Government must uphold customary international law of non-refoulement

1
74

The Malaysian Bar is deeply concerned with the Malaysian government’s action in deporting Praphan Pipithnamporn, an asylum seeker registered by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) in Kuala Lumpur, to Thailand on 10 May 2019, reportedly upon the request of the Thai government.

According to media reports, Praphan Pipithnamporn, a Thai national, is a member of the Organization for Thai Federation, a peaceful anti-monarchy group. She had been arrested many times between September and December 2018 by the Thai authorities, and an arrest warrant was issued in January 2019 for her participation in an anti-monarchy activity during the birthday memorial for the late King Rama IX on 5 December 2018.

She arrived in Malaysia in January 2019, and subsequently applied for asylum at the UNHCR in Kuala Lumpur. On 2 April 2019, the UNHCR registered her claim as an asylum seeker and designated her as a “person of concern”. As such, she should rightfully have been protected under the fundamental principle of international law known as non-refoulement.

It is disheartening and troubling that the Malaysian government violated international law and abdicated its legal and moral obligation not to deport individuals to situations where their very lives may be in serious jeopardy.

Although Thailand and Malaysia had signed a treaty on mutual legal assistance in criminal matters, under Section 8 of our Extradition Act 1992 there are prohibitions against extradition in certain circumstances, including:

(1) if the offence in respect of which [an individual’s] return is sought is of a political character or he proves to the Minister that the warrant for his return has in fact been made with a view to try or punish him for an offence of a political character;

READ MORE:  Don’t deport Pakistani asylum seekers from Thailand

(2) if the request for his surrender although purporting to be made for an extradition offence was in fact made for the purpose of prosecuting or punishing the person on account of his race, religion, nationality or political opinions; or

(3) if he might be prejudiced at his trial or punished or imprisoned by reason of his race, religion, nationality or political opinions.

The Malaysian Bar cautions the Malaysian government not to dismiss due consideration of these provisions.

The Malaysian Bar calls on the Malaysian government, as a responsible member of the international community, to honour, respect and uphold the rules and customs of international law — including the principle of non-refoulement — as well as the provisions of Malaysian law.

Abdul Fareed Abdul Gafoor is president of the Malaysian Bar.

This piece is reproduced from here and has been edited for style only.

Thanks for dropping by! Apart from the views expressed in Aliran's media statements and the NGO statements we have endorsed, the opinions in other pieces published here do not necessarily reflect Aliran's official position.

Our voluntary writers work hard to keep these articles free for all to read. But we do need funds to support our struggle for Justice, Freedom and Solidarity. To maintain our editorial independence, we do not carry any advertisements; nor do we accept funding from dubious sources. If everyone reading this was to make a donation, our fundraising target for the year would be achieved within a week. So please consider making a donation of whatever amount you can afford to sustain Aliran. Please make payments to Persatuan Aliran Kesedaran Negara, CIMB Bank account number 8004240948.

And why not become an Aliran member or subscribe to our FREE newsletters.

1
Join the conversation

avatar
750
1 Comment threads
0 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
1 Comment authors
Kuldeep Singh Gill Recent comment authors
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
Kuldeep Singh Gill

No only applies to idiots like z n